CIO-C™ Chief Information Officer – Certified™

CIO-C™ CHIEF INFORMATION OFFICER – CERTIFIED™ CREDENTIAL CERTIFICATION

Registration, Payment & Schedule of Classes

STEP 1: Download and complete your CIO-C Application and C-Suite Institute’s Affidavit of Identity forms and email by the given deadline below to: info@c-suiteinstitute.com

PLEASE DOWNLOAD CIO-C™ APPLICATION AND AFFIDAVIT OF IDENTITY FORMS BELOW:

CIO-C_Chief_Information_Officer_Certified_Application_Form

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EUROPE

CIO-C™ Chief Information Officer – Certified™ CREDENTIAL CERTIFICATION (UNITED KINGDOM)

Calendar & Schedule Of Classes (LONDON, ENGLAND):

Dates: 11 – 13 NOVEMBER 2019   | Starts: 7.00AM  Ends: 3.00PM (London Local Time, England ) | Online with Live Instructor |

PRICE: $14,999 (USD) per Participant

STEP 2: MAKE YOUR PAYMENT AT: 




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NORTH AMERICA

CIO-C™ Chief Information Officer – Certified™ CREDENTIAL CERTIFICATION (USA, CANADA, MEXICO)

Calendar & Schedule Of Classes (NORTH AMERICA):

Dates: 11 – 13 NOVEMBER 2019   | Starts: 9.00AM  Ends: 4.00PM (Eastern Standard Time in USA, Canada, Mexico) | Online with Live Instructor |

PRICE: $14,999 (USD) per Participant

STEP 2: MAKE YOUR PAYMENT AT: 




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MIDDLE-EAST:

CIO-C™ Chief Information Officer – Certified™ CREDENTIAL CERTIFICATION (MIDDLE-EAST: QATAR, OMAN, SAUDI ARABIA, KUWAIT, UAE (DUBAI)

Calendar & Schedule Of Classes (MIDDLE-EAST):

Dates: NOVEMBER 25 – 27, 2019   (CLASSES ARE SUNDAY THROUGH TUESDAYS) (DATES: TBA)

Starts: 9.00 AM  Ends: 4.00 PM (Local Time in MUSCAT, Oman) | Online & Interactive with Live Instructor |

Starts: 9.00 AM  Ends: 4.00 PM (Local Time in DUBAI, UAE) | Online & Interactive with Live Instructor |

Starts: 8.00 AM  Ends: 3.00 PM (Local Time in DOHA, Qatar ) |Online & Interactive with Live Instructor |

Starts: 8.00 AM  Ends: 3.00 PM (Local Time in RIYADH, Saudi Arabia) | Online & Interactive with Live Instructor |

Starts: 8.00 AM  Ends: 3.00 PM (Local Time in KUWAIT CITY, Kuwait) |Online & Interactive with Live Instructor |

PRICE: $14,999 (USD) per Participant

STEP 2: MAKE YOUR PAYMENT AT: 




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ASIA:

CIO-C™ Chief Information Officer – Certified™ CREDENTIAL CERTIFICATION (ASIA: CHINA, JAPAN, SINGAPORE)

Calendar & Schedule Of Classes (ASIA):

Dates: JANUARY, 2020   (Dates TBA)

Starts: 10.00 AM  Ends: 5.00 PM (Local Time in Shanghai, Beijing, CHINA) | Online & Interactive with Live Instructor |

Starts: 10.00 AM  Ends: 5.00 PM (Local Time in Singapore City, SINGAPORE) | Online & Interactive with Live Instructor |

PRICE: $14,999 (USD) per Participant

STEP 2: MAKE YOUR PAYMENT AT: 




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NORTH AMERICA:

CIO-C™ Chief Information Officer – Certified™ CREDENTIAL CERTIFICATION (USA, CANADA, MEXICO)

Calendar & Schedule Of Classes (NORTH AMERICA):

Dates: FEBRUARY, 2020   (Dates TBA) | Starts: 9.00AM  Ends: 4.00PM (Eastern Standard Time in USA, Canada, Mexico) | Online with Live Instructor |

PRICE: $14,999 (USD) per Participant

STEP 2: MAKE YOUR PAYMENT AT: 




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CIO-C™ Chief Information Officer – Certified™ CREDENTIAL CERTIFICATION (USA, CANADA, MEXICO)

Calendar & Schedule Of Classes (NORTH AMERICA):

Dates: APRIL, 2020   (Dates TBA) | Starts: 9.00AM  Ends: 4.00PM (Eastern Standard Time in USA, Canada, Mexico) | Online with Live Instructor |

PRICE: $14,999 (USD) per Participant

STEP 2: MAKE YOUR PAYMENT AT: 




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CIO-C™ Chief Information Officer – Certified™ is a trademark of The C-Suite Institute™ in the USA and internationally and fully protected under International Trademark and Copyrights Treaties and Laws among nations

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Introduction & Objectives

CIO-C™ CHIEF INFORMATION OFFICER – CERTIFIED™ CREDENTIAL CERTIFICATION PROGRAM OBJECTIVES

The CIO-C™ Chief Information Officer – Certified™ credential certification is a unique and cutting edge management program for Information Technology Executives, Leaders and Senior Managers who work in the Information Technology industry and are eager to achieve successful Information Technology management and execution.. The CIO-C™ Chief Information Officer – Certified™ program is aimed at the present and next generation of Information Technology Executives and Leaders, Information Technology Project Managers, Information Technology Senior Managers, Information Technology Engineers and Information Technology Professionals working for dynamic global Information Technology companies and Governmental agencies who need to broaden their horizons in the field and dimensions of our complex and rapidly changing Information Technology systems.

9 REASONS TO CHOOSE THE C-SUITE INSTITUTE™ EXECUTIVE PROGRAMS

  1. All C-Suite Institute™ Executive education program modules utilize case studies to reinforce teaching, evoke independent analysis and research; and provoke deep thought and critical thinking among participants
  2. C-Suite Institute™’s Curriculum is Global Based & has International Perspective – Applicable across all major continents (Africa, Europe, Asia, Australia, Americas)
  3. Applied & Practical Insights related to your industry and C-suite/Executive functions
  4. Renowned Faculty – Our Professors hold Advanced/Graduate/Post Graduate Degrees, and have worked in or currently work in Executive level positions
  5. Diverse Participant Mix from all geographies across the Globe
  6. Participants work across the top 50 Industries (Industries range from Aerospace to Information Technology (IT) to Finance & Banking to Oil & Gas to Energy to Utilities and numerous more)
  7. Participants attend from Fortune 500 & Global 2000 companies; Governments (local, state, Federal, National) from around the world; and International organizations and firms such as UN, World Bank, IMF, NASA, ICAO and numerous more
  8. Participants attend from Major World Governments in G-8, G20 & BRICS countries
  9. Participants attend from Major sports organizations such as FIFA and UEFA

 

CIO-C™ Chief Information Officer – Certified™ is a trademark of The C-Suite Institute™ in the USA and internationally and fully protected under International Trademark and Copyrights Treaties and Laws among nations

Requirements

CIO-C™ CHIEF INFORMATION OFFICER – CERTIFIED™ CREDENTIAL CERTIFICATION PROGRAM REQUIREMENTS PROCESS:

ADMISSIONS:

Admission is very selective and based on your professional level, achievement and organizational responsibility. No formal educational requirements apply, however most applicants have completed studies at the Bachelors or Masters or Doctorate levels and have backgrounds in Business, Engineering, Management, Finance, Computer Science, Human Resources, Information Management, Information Technology, Economics, Applied Sciences

CIO-C™ Chief Information Officer – Certified™ is a trademark of The C-Suite Institute™ in the USA and internationally and fully protected under International Trademark and Copyrights Treaties and Laws among nations

 

CIO-C™ CHIEF INFORMATION OFFICER – CERTIFIED™ CERTIFICATION CURRICULUM & MODULES:

CIO-C™ CHIEF INFORMATION OFFICER™ CERTIFICATION REQUIREMENTS:

The CIO-C™ Chief Information Officer – Certified™ credential certification consists of 4 modules delivered over three days

MODULE 1: FOUNDATIONAL

 (a) Executive Leadership, (b) Executive Strategy & Policy, (c) Executive Decision Making, (d) Executive Oversight, (e) Executive Transparency (f) Executive Accountability, (g) Executive Planning & Execution, (h) Executive Accounting, Finance & Budgeting, (i) Executive Project Management & Project Control Strategy & Planning, (j) Executive Problem Solving

MODULE 2:

(a) Leading & Managing People, (b) Leading & Managing Change, (c) Leading & Managing Goals & Priorities, (d) Leading & Managing Communications, (e) Leading & Managing Culture & Cultural Dynamics, (f) Leading & Managing Negotiations (g) Leading & Managing Organizational Politics (h) Leading & Managing Innovation & Technology (i) Leading & Managing Customers & Suppliers (j) Leading & Managing Competitive Advantage, (k) Leading & Managing Risks & Uncertainty (l) Leading & Managing Quality (j) Leading & Managing Crisis (m) Leading & Managing Conflicts (n) Managing & Controlling Waste, Fraud, Abuse, Neglect & Negligence (o) Implementing Management Controls & Use of Efficient and Effective Control Processes (p) Leading & Managing Claims & Disputes (q) Developing, Training, & Retaining Talent & High Performance teams

MODULE 3: FUNCTIONAL SPECIALIZATION/EXPERTISE

Advanced Information Technology Topics: Cyber Security, Information Assurance, Enterprise Architecture, Agile, IT Project Management, IT Project Controls and Earned Value Management (EVM)

MODULE 4: APPLIED/PRACTICALS

All CIO-C™s will complete the following:

  • Develop ‘My CIO-C Strategy & Execution Scorecard™’
  • Develop ‘My CIO-C Strategy & Execution Action Plan™’
  • Develop ‘My CIO-C Strategy & Execution Play Book™’
  • Develop ‘My CIO-C Policy™’

To fulfill the CIO – C™ Chief Information Officer – Certified™ credential certification requirements, all participants must attend and complete all Modules 1, 2, 3 & 4 over three days.

There are no examinations given. The CIO – C™ Chief Information Officer – Certified™ program is given in the English language only

                

CIO-C™ – INDUSTRIES SERVED & WHERE WE WORK:

CIO-C™ Chief Information Officer- Certified™s work in all Industries: US Federal Government, US Department of Defense (DoD), Management Consulting; Transportation, Defense, HealthCare, Utilities, Energy & Nuclear Power, Oil & Gas; Telecommunications, Information Technology; Computer, Security, Heavy Construction; Aerospace; Aviation; Banking

WHO MAY APPLY: All Vice Presidents, CIOs, IT Heads, IT Program Managers, Chief Project Officers, Senior Project Managers, Senior Managers, Program Managers, Project Control Officers (PCOs), Managers, Project Engineers and Senior Engineers who work in all industries across all governments, commercial firms, private firms, organizations and international organizations/firms.

 

8 REASONS TO CHOOSE THE C-SUITE INSTITUTE @EVMI™ EXECUTIVE PROGRAMS

  • All C-Suite Institute™ Executive education program modules utilize case studies to reinforce teaching, evoke independent analysis and research; and provoke deep thought and critical thinking among participants
  • Global Based Curriculum & International Perspective – Applicable across all major continents (Africa, Europe, Asia, Australia, Americas)
  • Applied & Practical Insights related to your industry and functions
  • Renowned Faculty – Our Professors hold Graduate/Post Graduate Degrees, and have worked in or currently work in Executive positions
  • Diverse Participant Mix from all geographies
  • Participants work across the top 50 Industries (Industries range and are from Healthcare to Aerospace to IT to Finance & Banking to Oil & Gas to Energy to Utilities and numerous more)
  • Participants attend from Fortune 500 & Global 2000 companies
  • Participants attend from Major World Governments in G-8, G20 & BRICS countries

 

The CIO – C™ Chief Information Officer – Certified™ program is given in the English language only.

CIO-C™ Chief Information Officer – Certified™ is a trademark of The C-Suite Institute™ in the USA and internationally and fully protected under International Trademark and Copyrights Treaties and Laws among nations

Who Should Apply

All CIOs, CTOs, Directors, Senior Project Managers, Senior Managers, Managers, Project Managers, Project Control Officers (PCOs), Project Engineers and Senior Engineers at all levels who work in the Information Technology industry and in Information Technology related functions.

CIO-C™ Chief Information Officer – Certified™ is a trademark of The C-Suite Institute™ in the USA and internationally and fully protected under International Trademark and Copyrights Treaties and Laws among nations

 

 

Participant Mix

PAST PARTICIPANTS

The CIO-C™ executive certification program has been strategically designed for executives who manage technical professionals. Past participants have included:
• CIOs
• Chief Technologists
• Directors of R&D and engineering
• Engineering and manufacturing VPs
• Corporate strategists
• Head scientists
• Project managers
• Systems information managers
• Product development managers
• Experienced individual contributors and staff professionals
• Vice presidents of engineering, manufacturing, and technology
• Directors of project, program or service management
• Product, service and business development
• Engineering and R&D program managers
• Chief project engineers
• Product design and process development engineers
• Technology strategists
• Project leaders
• Other key members of technical leadership and management

Some of the Organizations that our Alumni have worked at include the following:

The Governments of Brazil, Canada, France, Germany, Italy, Japan, Kosovo, Malawi, Mauritius, Nigeria, Sierra Leone, South Africa, Switzerland, UK, USA and Zambia.

Sub-national governments
• Federal Ministry of Finance, Ghana
• Fukushima Prefecture
• Lagos State Government
• National Treasury of South Africa
• Office of the Attorney General, Bahamas
• U.S. Agency for International Development; United Nations agencies & European Union organizations
• Council of the European Union
• European Commission
• International Atomic Energy Agency
• UNICEF
• United Nations, Department of Economic and Social Affairs
• United Nations Development Group
• Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations

Intergovernmental Agencies
• European Commission
• International Finance Corporation
• International Fund for Agricultural Development
• International Labor Organisation
• World Health Organization

Charities and NGOs
• ActionAid
• CARE International
• Concern Worldwide
• Farm Africa
• Global Alliance for Improved Nutrition
• Habitat for Humanity International
• International Crisis Group
• International Federation of the Red Cross
• Oxfam International
• Plan International
• Rainforest Alliance
• Save the Children International
• Tearfund
• WaterAid
• World Vision International

Central Banks & Financial Organizations
• African Development Bank
• AIG
• Asian Development Bank
• Banco de Mozambique
• Bank of Canada
• Bank of Japan
• Citigroup
• European Central Bank
• IMF
• Inter-American Development Bank
• JP Morgan
• National Bank of Abu Dhabi
• PricewaterhouseCoopers
• Rand Merchant Bank
• Reserve Bank of Vanuatu
• Standard Chartered Bank
• World Bank
• World Trade Organization

Energy, mining & manufacturing companies
• BP
• Ford Motor Company
• GlaxoSmithKline
• Nigerian National Petroleum Corporation
• Mitsui & Co
• Proctor and Gamble

Media & Telecoms companies
• BBC World Service
• Thomson Reuters
• Verizon
• Vodafone

TRADEMARKS:

CIO-C™ Chief Information Officer – Certified™ is a trademark of The C-Suite Institute™ in the USA and internationally and fully protected under International Trademark and Copyrights Treaties and Laws among nations

Testimonials

For testimonials, please visit:

CIO-C™ Chief Information Officer – Certified™ is a trademark of The C-Suite Institute™ in the USA and internationally and fully protected under International Trademark and Copyrights Treaties and Laws among nations

Faculty

ALL THE C-SUITE INSTITUTE™ INSTRUCTORS:

(1) Have Graduate Degrees and Master Of Science (MS) Degrees in Finance, Economics, Project Management or MS Degree in Engineering (Electrical, Civil, Computer, Mechanical, Aeronautical, Software), Or Computer Science Or Technology Management or Information Systems Technology Or Master of Business Administration (MBA); or Phd or DSc in related field
(2) Have Over Fifteen Years of Executive Management Experience in Industry Or Government Or Both;
(3) Have Taught or Teach In Graduate Degree Programs In Accredited Universities in the USA and abroad

CIO-C™ Chief Information Officer – Certified™ is a trademark of The C-Suite Institute™ in the USA and internationally and fully protected under International Trademark and Copyrights Treaties and Laws among nations

The Role of Chief Information Officer (CIO)

 DEFINITION of ‘Chief Information Officer – CIO’

A chief information officer, or CIO, is the company executive responsible for the management, implementation and usability of information and computer technologies. The CIO analyzes how these technologies benefit the company or improve an existing business process, and then integrates a system to realize that benefit or improvement.

The number of CIOs has increased greatly with the expanded use of IT and computer technology in businesses. The CIO deals with matters such as creating a website that allows the company to reach more customers or integrating new inventory software to help better manage the use of inventory.

BREAKING DOWN ‘Chief Information Officer – CIO’

The role of CIO has changed over the decades. In the 1980s, the position was more technical in nature as companies maintained their own internal computers, databases and communications networks. In the 2010s, thanks to cloud computing, wireless communications, big-data analytics and mobile devices, CIOs develop strategies and computer systems that keep businesses competitive in a fast-changing global marketplace. One major responsibility of a contemporary CIO is to predict the future of computer technology trends that give a business an advantage over others. The day-to-day operations of maintaining a computer system generally falls on a person known as a chief operating officer of IT.

Qualifications of CIOs

Businesses generally require that a CIO have a bachelor’s degree in a related field, such as computer science, computer information systems, IT management or database administration. A master’s in business administration, coupled with a computer-based degree, can help a CIO run the business side of strategy, development, hiring and budgeting.

Skills Needed

CIOs must employ several hard and soft skills to excel at this job. CIOs need to know how to run a business because the job requires a lot of knowledge with regard to how a company works from top to bottom. CIOs should also be aware of technology trends because IT may change in two to three years. This type of person needs to build relationships within the company, with other top-level executives and colleagues in the field. A CIO must know how every department of a company works to determine the technical needs of each branch of the firm, and this person has to excel at communications. The ability to translate technical terms in ways that non-IT employees can easily understand is often a must.

Salary

As expected, the role of CIO pays well. A company executive that holds the highest-ranking IT position in a firm averaged nearly $200,000 per year in 2014. Salaries ranged from $153,000 to $246,750. In small companies, CIOs typically make less money and have different job titles. Smaller businesses may have an IT manager, lead database manager, chief security officer or application development manager.

 

FROM WIKIPEDIA:

Chief information officer
From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Chief information officer (CIO), chief digital information officer (CDIO) or information technology (IT) director, is a job title commonly given to the most senior executive in an enterprise responsible for the information technology and computer systems that support enterprise goals. Typically, the CIO reports directly to the chief executive officer but may also report to the chief operating officer or chief financial officer. In military organizations, they report to the commanding officer. The Chief Information Officer role was first defined[1] in 1981 by William R. Synnott, former Senior Vice President of the Bank of Boston, and William H. Gruber, former professor at the MIT Sloan School of Management.[2]

Contents
1 The need for CIOs
2 Roles and responsibilities
3 Risks involved
4 Information technology
5 Distinction between CIO, CDO and CTO
6 Awards and recognition
7 See also
8 References
9 External links
The need for CIOs
CIOs or CDIOs form a key part of any business that utilizes technology and data. In recent times, it has been identified that an understanding of just business or just IT is not sufficient.[3] CIOs manage IT resources and plan “ICT including policy and practice development, planning, budgeting, resourcing and training”.[4] In addition to this, CIOs are becoming increasingly important in calculating how to increase profits via the use of ICT frameworks, as well as the vital role of reducing expenditure and limiting damage by setting up controls and planning for possible disasters. Computer Weekly magazine highlights that “53% of IT leaders report a shortage of people with high-level personal skills” in the workplace.[5] Most organisations can’t expect to fill demand for skilled resources and 57% of CIOs don’t have the right learning and support mechanisms in place to enable current staff to meet the skill shortage. [6] CIOs are needed to decrease the gulf between roles carried out by both IT professionals and non-IT professionals in businesses in order to set up effective and working relationships.

Roles and responsibilities
The Chief Information Officer of an organization is responsible for a number of roles. First and most importantly, the CIO must fulfill the role of business leader.[7] As a CIO must make executive decisions regarding things such as the purchase of IT equipment from suppliers or the creation of new systems, they are therefore responsible for leading and directing the workforce of their specific organization. In addition, the CIO is ‘required to have strong organizational skills’.[8] This is particularly relevant for a Chief Information Officer of an organization who must balance roles in order to gain a competitive advantage and keep the best interests of the organization’s employees. CIOs also have the responsibility of recruiting, so it is important that they take on the best employees to complete the jobs the company needs fulfilling.

In addition, CIOs are directly required to map out both the ICT strategy and ICT policy of an organization. The ICT strategy covers future proofing, procurement, and the external and internal standards laid out by an organization. Similarly, the CIO must write up the ICT policy, detailing how ICT is utilized and applied. Both are needed for the protection of the organization in the short and long term and the process of strategizing for the future. Paul Burfitt, former CIO of AstraZeneca, also outlines the CIO’s role of IT governance, which he refers to as the “clarifying” of “accountability and the role of committees”.[9]

Risks involved
As the CIO has a large number of responsibilities such as provision of finance, recruitment of professionals and development of policy and strategy, the risks are consequently vast. The CIO of U.S company Target was forced into resignation in 2014 after the theft of 40 million credit card details and 70 million customer details by hackers.[10] CIOs carry out a large number of roles and therefore the chance of failure is very high. In this way, any CIO must be knowledgeable about the industry so they can adapt and reduce the chance of error.

Information technology
Information technology and its systems have become so important that the CIO has come to be viewed in many organizations as a key contributor in formulating strategic goals for an organization. The prominence of the CIO position has greatly risen as information, and the information technology that drives it, has become an increasingly important part of the modern organization. Many CIOs are adding additional c-level titles to reflect the growing importance of technology in successfully running companies; this trend is referred to as the CIO-plus. The CIO may be a member of the executive committee of an organization, and/or may often be required to engage at board level depending on the nature of the organization and its operating structure and governance environment. No specific qualifications are intrinsic to the CIO position, though the typical candidate may have expertise in a number of technological fields – computer science, software engineering, or information systems. Many candidates have Master of Business Administration or Master of Science in Management degrees.[11] More recently, CIOs’ leadership capabilities, business acumen and strategic perspectives have taken precedence over technical skills. It is now quite common for CIOs to be appointed from the business side of the organization, especially if they have project management skills.

Despite the strategic nature of the role, a 2017 survey, conducted by Logicalis, of 890 CIOs across 23 countries found that 62% of CIOs spend 60% or more of their time on day to day IT activities.[12]

In 2012, Gartner Executive Programs conducted a global CIO survey and received responses from 2,053 CIOs from 41 countries and 36 industries.[13] Gartner reported that survey results indicated that the top ten technology priorities for CIOs for 2013 were analytics and business intelligence, mobile technologies, cloud computing, collaboration technologies, legacy modernization, IT management, customer relationship management, virtualization, security, and enterprise resource planning.

CIO magazine’s “State of the CIO 2008” survey asked 558 IT leaders whom they report to. The results were: CEO (41%), CFO (23%), COO (16%), Corporate CIO (7%) and Other (13%).[14]

Typically, a CIO is involved with driving the analysis and re-engineering of existing business processes, identifying and developing the capability to use new tools, reshaping the enterprise’s physical infrastructure and network access, and with identifying and exploiting the enterprise’s knowledge resources. Many CIOs head the enterprise’s efforts to integrate the Internet into both its long-term strategy and its immediate business plans. CIOs are often tasked with either driving or heading up crucial IT projects that are essential to the strategic and operational objectives of an organization. A good example of this would be the implementation of an Enterprise Resource Planning (ERP) system, which typically has wide-ranging implications for most organizations.

Another way that the CIO role is changing is an increased focus on service management.[15] As SaaS, IaaS, BPO and other more flexible value delivery techniques are brought into organizations the CIO usually functions as a 3rd party manager for the organization. In essence, a CIO in the modern organization is required to possess business skills and the ability to relate to the organization as a whole, as opposed to being a technological expert with limited functional business expertise. The CIO position is as much about anticipating trends in the market place with regard to technology as it is about ensuring that the business navigates these trends through expert guidance and proper strategic IT planning that is aligned to the corporate strategy of the organization.

Distinction between CIO, CDO and CTO
The roles of Chief Information Officer, Chief Digital Officer and Chief Technology Officer are commonly blurred. Tom Silver, the North American senior vice president for Dice, states that CTOs are concerned with technology itself, whereas CIOs are much more concerned with its applications in the business and how this can be managed.[16]

More specifically, CIOs manage a business’s IT systems and functions, creates and delivers strategies and policies, and places great emphasis on internal customers. In contrast to this, CTOs place emphasis on the external customers to the organization and focus on how different technology can make the company more profitable.[17]

The traditional definition of CTOs focused on using technology as an external competitive advantage now includes CDOs who use the power of modern technologies, online design and big data to digitalise a business.

Awards and recognition
It is not uncommon for CIOs to be recognised and awarded annually, particularly in the technology space. These awards are commonly dictated by the significance of their contribution to the industry and generally occur in local markets only. Awards are generally judged by industry peers, or senior qualified executives such as the chief executive officer, chief operating officer or chief financial officer. Generally awards recognise substantial impact to the local technology market.

In Australia, the top 50 CIOs are recognised annually under the CIO50 banner.[18] In the United States of America, United Kingdom and New Zealand CIOs are recognised under the CIO100 banner.[19][20][21]

See also
Chief technology officer
Chief digital officer
Chief executive officer
Chief financial officer
Chief operating officer
Chief investment officer
Not to be mixed up with Public Information Officer
References
“williamgruber”. williamgruber.
Synnott W.R. and Gruber W.H. (1981) Information Resource Management: Opportunities and Strategies for the 1980s. New York: Wiley-Interscience.
von Simson, Ernest. “The new role of the CIO”. ww.businessweek.com. Retrieved 26 October 2014.
University of Nottingham. “The role of a Chief Information Officers (CIO) or equivalent Senior ICT Manager”. www.nottingham.ac.uk. Retrieved 26 October 2014.
Manwani, Sharm; Flint, David. “From manager to chief information officer”. www.computerweekly.com. Retrieved 26 October 2014.
“CIOWaterCooler – The Changing Shape of IT”. Retrieved 15 June 2017.
Peppard, Joe (August 2010). “Unlocking the Performance of the Chief Information Officer (CIO)”. California Management Review. 52 (4): 5. Retrieved 26 October 2014.
Lawry, Rachel; Waddell, Dianne; Singh, Mohini (2007). “Roles, Responsibilities and Futures of Chief Information Officers (CIOs) in the Public Sector” (PDF): 3. Retrieved 26 October 2014.
Computer Weekly. “What exactly does a chief information officer do?”. www.computerweekly.com. Retrieved 26 October 2014.
Vaas, Lisa. “Target CIO Beth Jacob resigns in breach aftermath”. www.nakedsecurity.sophos.com. Retrieved 27 October 2014.
Meridith Levinson (2007-07-05). “Should You Get an MBA? – CIO.com – Business Technology Leadership”. CIO.com. Retrieved 2012-03-28.
“Logicalis CIO Survey 2017-2018 | Think Hub”. www.logicalis-thinkhub.com. 2017-11-15. Retrieved 2018-01-22.
“Gartner Executive Program Survey of More Than 2,000 CIOs Shows Digital Technologies Are Top Priorities in 2013”. Gartner. Retrieved 12 July 2013.
“State of the CIO 2008 Data Shows CIO Salaries, Influence Rising”. CIO. Retrieved 27 February 2010.
“CIO Magazine: Recession Shifts IT Service Management into Fast Lane”. Cio.com. 2010-02-26. Retrieved 2012-03-28.
Zetlin, Minda. “CIO or CTO- What’s in a Title?”. www.oracle.com. Retrieved 27 October 2014.
Hiner, Jason. “Sanity check: What’s the difference between CIO and CTO?”. www.techrepublic.com. Retrieved 27 October 2014.
“Home- CIO 50- CIO”. CIO.
“CIO 100 Symposium and Awards”. CIO.
“CIO 100 Archive – CIO UK”. www.cio.co.uk.
“CIO 100- CIO New Zealand”. CIO New Zealand.
External links
El CIO y la ayuda a la producción El papel de CIO en una compañía
[1] a summary of CIO competencies based on the Clinger-Cohen competencies for CIOs, 2010.